Learn about hereditary cancer

Information on increased genetic risk will help you create, together with your doctor, a personalized plan to prevent or detect cancer at an early stage and easier to treat.

10-15% of cancers are caused by inherited genetic mutations

Hereditary cancer is caused by an inherited genetic mutation. In this situation, a recurrent pattern of cancer is observed over the course of two or three generations (more members of the same family diagnosed with the same type of cancer and family members diagnosed with cancer much younger than the average).

Family cancer refers to cancer that occurs in families with a higher frequency. If this type of cancer does not associate a specific mutation, family cancer can have a hereditary component that has not yet been identified.

Spontaneous cancer refers to the type of cancer that occurs as a result of spontaneous mutations accumulated by a person during his or her life. Spontaneous cancer can’t be explained by just one cause. There are other factors that can contribute to the development of spontaneous cancer, such as: aging, lifestyle or exposure to certain environmental factors.

A mutation can significantly influence cancer

Gene mutations analyzed by the HEREDITARY CANCER TEST are not common, but when they are present, they significantly increase the risk of cancer.

For example, a BRCA1 mutation can significantly increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer (up to 81%). A mutation in the APC gene may increase the risk for colorectal cancer of a man or woman to 70-100%.

Your doctor can adjust your medical screening plan if you have a mutation

Information on the presence of a cancer-increasing mutation will allow you and your doctor to create a personalized screening plan that will increase your chances of early diagnosis.

Early diagnosis may increase the chances of survival

Survival rates increase significantly when cancer is diagnosed in early stages that can be treated.

How the mutations affect the risk in women

A mutation can significantly influence a woman’s risk of developing cancer.

For example, a BRCA1 mutation may increase the risk of breast cancer by up to 81% and ovarian cancer by up to 54% up to 80 years.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are found in about 1 in 300 individuals but significantly increase the risk of cancer. Mutations in other genes are more common but have a lower effect on the risk of developing hereditary cancer.

How genetic mutations influence the risk in men

A mutation can significantly influence a man’s risk of developing hereditary cancer.

For example, a mutation in the APC gene may increase the risk of colorectal cancer to 70-100% to 80 years if not treated.

APC gene mutations are rare – less than 1% of colorectal cancers – but significantly affect cancer risk. Mutations in other genes are more common, but have a lower effect on the risk of developing hereditary cancer.

We help you understand your risk for the most common hereditary cancers

Hereditary Cancer Test analyzes 30 genes. A mutation of one of these genes may increase the risk of developing hereditary cancer, including breast, ovarian, colorectal and prostate cancer.

The most relevant genes in hereditary cancers

Hereditary Cancer Test analyzes most relevant genes whose mutations may increase the risk for hereditary cancers

Relatives can benefit from the test information

Your results can also be useful to your relatives, regardless of their gender.

Men, just like women, can transmit the mutations to their children, and children, both girls and boys, can inherit these mutations. If an individual has a mutation, it is a 50% probability that their siblings and children will have the same mutation.

The negative result for a mutation known in the family is important information.

If one of the relatives carries a mutation and your results indicate that you do not have the same mutation, it means you have not inherited that mutation. For example, if your sister has the MLH1 mutation and you do not have it, the risk of developing colorectal cancer, uterine or other cancers is the same as any other person.

Even if your relatives do not have an identified mutation, a negative result from the Hereditary Cancer Test may indicate a minimal risk of having an inherited predisposition for certain types of cancer.

We recommend seeing family history to understand who had cancer and who had been genetically tested for hereditary cancer.


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